Posted by: miralbessed | October 27, 2012

Thank Whitaker and Baxter for todays never ending campaign ads.

While it might be slightly unfair to blame Whitaker and Baxter for all the annoying political ads we are forced to watch and hear today, I can’t help but to attribute some of this craziness to them.  In The Newyorker.com’s article, The Lie Factory,  Jill Lepore lists the resources and tools that were utilized in a typical campaign during the 40’s. As our resources have expanded exponentially these days, so have the number and methods of political ads. Between pamphlets, TV and radio commercials, internet ads/pop ups and finally ground efforts, the 2012 political campaigns for both presidential candidates have now surpassed 500 million dollars according to MSNBC’s Nightly News. Mit Romney campaign has reportedly spent $273 million, $205 million of which came from his outside resource AKA the Super PACs (Political Action Committee). President Obama is not trailing far back. His campaign has so far spent $239 million dollars $33 million of which comes from the Super PACs supporting him.

The above figures paint an ugly and unfortunate picture about todays politics. It no longer is about the issues facing the nation but rather about the depth of a candidate’s and his suporters’ pocket books. As we clearly observe this massive shift in spending and strategy from the good old days of Whitaker and Baxter’s Campaign Inc. to the present day freak show, what can be expected of future political campaigns to come and what role will  the Super PACs play in the speculated change?

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